PROSOYA

The little village of PROSOYA, a co-op project for boys, situated just a few kilometers from Huancabamba, about a twenty-minute walk along a dirt road that passes between lush green fields, and steep tree covered hillsides.  The project for girls is outside of Oxapampa.

PROSOYA is an ONG, or NGO, (Non-Governmental Organization) that was started by German settlers to the area some 150 years ago.  It is a self-sustaining school of 689 Hectares or 1,702 Acres that takes in students from all over Peru, but particularly ones that are in extreme poverty, or have come from other walks-of-life that need a helping hand to learn some Life Skills.

Skills learned at PROSOYA include; Agriculture, Carpentry, Fish Hatchery, Mechanic, Bakery, Beekeeping, and Restaurant, also housing is on site for students and some staff.

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Below is the main office, with a gift shop that sells the honey and coffee produced by PROSOYA.

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The restaurant where meals are prepared and served by and for the students.

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A bust of the PROSOYA founder.

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Some of the living quarters for students.

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Quito Quito Fruit – solanum quitoense, is a subtropical perennial plant from northwestern South America, and named after Quito, Ecuador that makes a very tasty juice or ice cream flavor. Below the fruit is new growth, and will turn an orange color when mature.

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Coffee production area.

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Plants for health, such as aola vera and other herbs.

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Area for growing fungus, mushrooms.

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Beekeeping.  The boxes are made in the carpentry shop.

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Fish hatcher with trout, below.

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One of the holding ponds packed with trout.

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Map of a nature trail that passes through the jungle to a lookout point.

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The dogs were eager to join me on the trail.

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The dense vegetation in the high jungle is a testament to the determination of the first German/Austrian settlers in the area.

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