Category: Travel

Nine Mile Canyon

South-East of Price Utah is the small town of Wellington, Utah on U.S. Highway 6/191. A small brown sign posted on Hwy. 191 marks your turnoff into Nine Mile Canyon.

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The name Nine Mile Canyon is misleading, as it is actually sixty miles or more in length. Until 2004 it was an unpaved road, but due to the oil and gas industry, the road is blacktopped almost fifty miles into the canyon to the Great Hunt Panel. Despite being paved, it’s not a heavily traveled road, which makes for a leisurely day trip in and out of the canyon.

Nine Mile Canyon has been a major thoroughfare through the West Tavaputs Plateau of central Utah for nearly 8,000 years. On my trip, I ended up having to exit the canyon the same way I came in, as there was mud and snow well past the Great Hunt Panel.  When the road is passable, there are two other exit points.

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For longer stays, the Nine Mile Ranch offers a bed & breakfast, cabins and camping.

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There were lots of deer grazing in the fields and along the roadside…another reason to drive slower.

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The first petroglyphs start appearing a little more than five miles in.  The majority are not signposted, so you have to drive slow and look at the sandstone panels on boulders and cliff walls to spot them. The good news is that most can easily be seen from the comfort of your car right along the roadside.  I recommend however, a pair of binoculars and a camera with a zoom lens to really get a good view and great pictures.

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There are literally thousands of petroglyphs, and some pictographs higher up the hillsides, and in the side canyons for those that are able to hike.

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The petroglyphs and pictographs date back to the Fremont Culture 300 – 1200 AD and some historic graffiti from the 19th century pioneers.

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There are a few dilapidated old buildings along the road, one being a stage-coach stop.

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An alternate route out of the canyon is to Myton, Utah

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A side trip up Gate Canyon for a couple miles netted a few good photo’s of rock formations, but no petroglyphs.

 

 

At Daddy Canyon parking area there are the remains of an old ranch corral, and many well preserved petroglyphs, along with a 0.75 mile trail that runs along the base of the cliffs for up close viewing of the ancient artwork.

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Further down the road, the landscapes were beautiful.

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A short, steep path up the hillside leads to the Fremont Village, which most might find unimpressive; however, the views up and down Nine Mile Canyon are grand.

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The dwellings were rock overhangs, or pits in the rocks.

 

 

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I hope you enjoyed the photo tour of Nine Mile Canyon.

Fly Geyser

I had to take the shot from a quarter-mile out…

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The Fly Ranch Geyser sits on private property located 20 miles (32km) North of Gerlach, Nevada on the right-hand side of SR 34.

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The Geyser, man-made by chance, along with natural forces when in 1964 while exploritory drilling for geothermal  energy.  It was found that the water coming from the spring was a constant 200 degrees Fahrenheit, or 93 Celsius.  Water boils at 212 F. so a little shy of being useful for geothermal energy production.  The well was either not capped at all, or not capped very well.

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As a result, the constant pressure of the hot spring has been spraying mineralized water five feet or more into the air since 1964, depositing several inches per year.

Once owned by the Fly Ranch, the property has now changed owners. It’s new owners are the Burning Man Organization

I used a 250mm zoom lens, plus the camera’s digital zoom to bring the subject to me.

 

Eugene, Oregon Freeze

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Tree limbs were brought down all over Eugene and Portland from the weight of the ice. But on a coastal excursion, the oceanic climate offered a reprieve.  Pictured below is a Pacific Ocean sunset, just South of Newport, Oregon.

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RUPAC

 

Machu Picchu limeño – The Machu Picchu of Lima

 

The trip began in Lima, at the ZBUSS terminal, (Zitabus) at Jr. Julian Pineyro 440 – Rimac – Lima. There is also another terminal at Plaza Norte. Cost: Monday –Friday 7 Soles, Saturday-Sunday 8.50 Soles. DNI, Passport required.

After two hours of Jackie Chan fight scenes playing on the bus TV, we rolled into the city of Huaral, located north, in the state of Lima. We took a taxi a short ride near the Mercado (market) where fresh juice, fruit, and water can be purchased. There were several taxi drivers on the sidewalk and haggling over prices, (around 30-35 Soles each person). Luckily we had a couple from Huaral in our group, and they took us to the Tourista Terminal a short walk back down the road. There a couple of vehicles were hired as we had nine people in our group, for 25 Soles each. (Contact info: Jose Rafael P. Claro: 997277583 Movi: 995729290, or 7252578) Jose can haul up to 7 people, 6 comfortable plus gear on top, and can pick up/drop-off at the bus terminal if arranged ahead of time.

Matucana

For this day trip, my friend Gino and I traveled three hours by bus from Lima, passing Chosica, to the little mountain town of Matucana, which sits at 2389 meters, 7841 feet above sea level, and offers five different hikes or areas to visit. For this outing, we chose the hike to Antankallo waterfall, a short 2.6 km hike with an elevation gain of 361 meters, 1181 feet at the falls.

The trail is well groomed with some trashcans at the midpoint, and the falls. At one point, I rounded a corner and met three ladies from Lima on their descent, wearing flip-flop sandals, and flats. Not much foot protection, but it’s an easy to moderate hike, depending on your personal fitness level. After living in Lima for four years at near sea level, an altitude adjustment was a minor concern.

Matucana is a quiet town, where everyone was very friendly and talkative. Besides hiking, it’s a great place to purchase farm fresh milk, cheese, and butter without the hormones and antibiotics. Un-pasteurized, un-radiated, and I lived to tell about it.

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Lovely fellow-hikers from Lima on the trail.

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TDS Bottled Water Test

WHAT IS THE BEST BOTTLED WATER IN PERU FOR YOUR $?

In Peru, the expensive bottled water shipped halfway around the world can be found in the big chain grocery stores. Water like Fiji, and Evian for around $5.00 a bottle.  In this test, I used the most common bottled water found in Peru, where 99% of the locals shop in the markets, mom and pop bodega’s, and roadside stands.

The results from the (TDS) Total Dissolved Solids test are as follows:

  • Agua del Grifo (Tap Water): 278
  • Cielo: 257
  • Vida:371
  • San Mateo: 352
  • San Luis: 041    

What is TDS?

Total Dissolved Solids can be heavy metals such as, lead, copper, mercury, arsenic, and cadmium.  It can also be salts in the form of potassium, calcium, sodium, and magnesium.  It is measured in PPM or Parts Per Million.

Chosica

Much of the winter, and much of the year for that matter, Lima is cloudy and sees little sunshine due to an inversion created by the Andes. If a person needs a dose of natural vitamin D, a short trip north, south or east of Lima is often the ticket to catch some rays of sun.
Chosica is a small town east of Lima, about two and a half hours by public bus for 3.50 Soles. Chosica has a large park as the main square, and there are several smaller parks along the Rimac River. It makes a nice day trip; however there are accommodations for an overnight trip.

Paracas and Ica’s Huacachina Desert Oasis

A journey South to Paracas and Ica begins at one of Lima’s bus terminals such as Soyuz, or Cruz del Sur. Travel time to Pisco, 240km’s is about 3hr 30mins by bus. If your bus doesn’t go directly to Paracas, then get off in Pisco, and take a taxi to Paracas. There are plenty of hotel accommodations in the small village, which lies in the Atacama Desert in the Paracas National Preserve, and along the shores of Pisco Bay.

_DSC5398The number one attraction in Paracas is a two hour boat tour of the Ballestas Islands. Numerous speed boats take turns docking against the pier in a sort of pecking order, as tourists pour over the side of the pier into the boats which fills up quickly. At the entrance to the pier sits a booth which charges an entry fee to enter the preserve, and everything seemed straight forward at first. However, it was a disorganized chaos, or so it seemed while waiting in line to purchase a ticket. Several tour boat operator touts were rattling off different prices like an auction in reverse. Break out your negotiating skills here to try for a better deal. A Russian entrepreneur has built a new pier beside the old one, as well as a terminal with a small aquarium which should all be operational by now.  I took this trip in August 2014.

Obrajillo

 A Weekend Getaway, Or Any Day Of The Week.

Nestled in a bowl-shaped valley, surrounded by beautiful mountains with flowing waterfalls, terraced landscapes for farming, and split by the Chillon River, sits the small village of Obrajillo. Belonging to the municipality of Canta, the capital of the Canta Province, in the Lima Region of Peru, and approximately three hours by bus from the hustle and bustle of Lima; is rest and relaxation waiting.

Machu Picchu – A Virtual Tour Part 2 of 2

Machu Picchu – A Virtual Tour Part 1

Machu Picchu – Getting There – Photo’s -Travel Tips

After a four hour journey, your train has arrived at Machu Picchu Pueblo, or Aguas Calientes as it is normally called. Now, you have a few options. You can make your way through the market full of tourist trinkets, cross the Vilcanota River by a foot bridge, and head directly for the buses that take you switch backing twenty-minutes up to the front gate of Machu Picchu.