Tag: Nature

County Road 34

Driving along CR-34 last spring, on my way to and from Fly Ranch Geyser, I snapped a few landscape photos of the Black Rock Desert/High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area.  While not passable at the time, I wold certainly like to return and explore the area further.

_DSC0142

The area is very remote: No Services, No Water, You Will Be On Your On.

_DSC0143

Soaked with water from an abnormally wet Spring, these now dry lake beds and the shorelines were home to ancient people and animals that date back some 12,000 years ago.

_DSC0145

_DSC0144

_DSC0139

_DSC0140

Several Places in the canyon, I saw steam billowing up from natural hot springs.

_DSC0155

Nine Mile Canyon

South-East of Price Utah is the small town of Wellington, Utah on U.S. Highway 6/191. A small brown sign posted on Hwy. 191 marks your turnoff into Nine Mile Canyon.

_DSC0001

The name Nine Mile Canyon is misleading, as it is actually sixty miles or more in length. Until 2004 it was an unpaved road, but due to the oil and gas industry, the road is blacktopped almost fifty miles into the canyon to the Great Hunt Panel. Despite being paved, it’s not a heavily traveled road, which makes for a leisurely day trip in and out of the canyon.

Nine Mile Canyon has been a major thoroughfare through the West Tavaputs Plateau of central Utah for nearly 8,000 years. On my trip, I ended up having to exit the canyon the same way I came in, as there was mud and snow well past the Great Hunt Panel.  When the road is passable, there are two other exit points.

_DSC0002

_DSC0006

For longer stays, the Nine Mile Ranch offers a bed & breakfast, cabins and camping.

_DSC0007

There were lots of deer grazing in the fields and along the roadside…another reason to drive slower.

_DSC0014_DSC0015

_DSC0067

The first petroglyphs start appearing a little more than five miles in.  The majority are not signposted, so you have to drive slow and look at the sandstone panels on boulders and cliff walls to spot them. The good news is that most can easily be seen from the comfort of your car right along the roadside.  I recommend however, a pair of binoculars and a camera with a zoom lens to really get a good view and great pictures.

_DSC0024_DSC0025_DSC0033

There are literally thousands of petroglyphs, and some pictographs higher up the hillsides, and in the side canyons for those that are able to hike.

_DSC0039

The petroglyphs and pictographs date back to the Fremont Culture 300 – 1200 AD and some historic graffiti from the 19th century pioneers.

_DSC0043

There are a few dilapidated old buildings along the road, one being a stage-coach stop.

_DSC0019_DSC0020_DSC0021_DSC0023_DSC0041_DSC0042_DSC0044_DSC0045_DSC0046_DSC0048

An alternate route out of the canyon is to Myton, Utah

_DSC0055_DSC0054_DSC0056_DSC0057

A side trip up Gate Canyon for a couple miles netted a few good photo’s of rock formations, but no petroglyphs.

 

 

At Daddy Canyon parking area there are the remains of an old ranch corral, and many well preserved petroglyphs, along with a 0.75 mile trail that runs along the base of the cliffs for up close viewing of the ancient artwork.

_DSC0099_DSC0094_DSC0093_DSC0105_DSC0103_DSC0102_DSC0100

Further down the road, the landscapes were beautiful.

_DSC0071_DSC0072_DSC0065_DSC0064_DSC0063

A short, steep path up the hillside leads to the Fremont Village, which most might find unimpressive; however, the views up and down Nine Mile Canyon are grand.

_DSC0113

The dwellings were rock overhangs, or pits in the rocks.

 

 

_DSC0121_DSC0122_DSC0123_DSC0125_DSC0124_DSC0127_DSC0128_DSC0132_DSC0133_DSC0135

I hope you enjoyed the photo tour of Nine Mile Canyon.

BLM Kills 45,000 Wild Horses and Burros

The Wild Horse – An American icon and spirit of the West. Free roaming the open range now for multiple centuries.

_DSC0146

How many people get to see wild horses?  Hurry, while you still can…

This story broke in September 2016, eight months ago already.  I felt compelled to bring it up after recently photographing these majestic animals in Northwest Nevada.  It’s estimated roughly 70,000 wild horses roam the West’s public lands. For anyone living in, or visiting the United States, this is Your land, and Your horses.

Public lands, managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), are often leased by ranchers to graze their cattle on.  The Bureau said ranchers were complaining because their cattle had to compete for food with the wild horses.  The BLM has been caught before illegally selling wild horses for slaughter.  In this case, thousands of wild horses and burros were rounded up.  The sick and injured were sold to slaughterhouses.  Much of the meat is sent to Europe, and mostly France. (You can tell if cooked meat is horse, as it will still be very red.) However, the remaining 45,000 wild horses and burros were corralled and pinned, and then sentenced to death by the BLM’s National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board voting to exterminate.  They also want to sterilize the remaining wild horses on the open range.  So in a generation, being able to see these horses in their natural habitat, may come to an end.

_DSC0147_DSC0137

With a quick StartPage.com search on the subject, you can find petitions if you’re into that.  Personally I don’t think protesting and petitions work. No, if you want someone’s attention, hit them where it hurts – In the wallet.  The BLM needs reorganizing, new management, or defunded.

The photo’s were taken in early March 2017 North of Gerlach, Nevada on State Route 34.

Eugene, Oregon Freeze

On a recent trip to Eugene, Oregon I arrived to find the city encapsulated in ice._dsc1469_dsc1474_dsc1480_dsc1482_dsc1479

Tree limbs were brought down all over Eugene and Portland from the weight of the ice. But on a coastal excursion, the oceanic climate offered a reprieve.  Pictured below is a Pacific Ocean sunset, just South of Newport, Oregon.

_dsc1483

Colorado Mule Deer

 

This buck hung around the property for several weeks during the rut, and hunting season. The property is a wintering ground for deer, and if he makes it through the winter, he will have a bigger rack next year.  More than likely, he has been coming here all his life.

Owl

owl

With the sudden passing of my dad in late March this year, I returned to Colorado for several months before going back to Peru again. I drove all over the Untied States visiting relatives, covering 9,000 miles in just a month.  As a side trip to my last visit to Peru, I spent a week touring Cartagena, Colombia, making it my thirty-first country.  After relocating all my belongings to a new apartment in Lima, I’m back in Colorado for the winter.   This is my first post since Rupac, in early March.

Pictured above is one of three resident owls on the property in Colorado, which is teaming with wildlife, and a great opportunity to practice wildlife photography.

Obrajillo

 A Weekend Getaway, Or Any Day Of The Week.

Nestled in a bowl-shaped valley, surrounded by beautiful mountains with flowing waterfalls, terraced landscapes for farming, and split by the Chillon River, sits the small village of Obrajillo. Belonging to the municipality of Canta, the capital of the Canta Province, in the Lima Region of Peru, and approximately three hours by bus from the hustle and bustle of Lima; is rest and relaxation waiting.